The Hatewatch blog is managed by the staff of the Intelligence Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based civil rights organization.

Critic: King’s Proposed Hearings on Muslim ‘Radicalization’ Evokes McCarthyism

By Ryan Lenz on December 23, 2010 - 4:39 pm, Posted in Anti-Muslim

U.S. Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), known for his incendiary remarks about Muslim Americans, has asked for a round of hearings into the radicalization of Muslim America – a move at least one member of Congress worries smacks of a Joseph McCarthy-style witch hunt.

In an editorial published this week in Newsday, and in subsequent cable news interviews, King, the incoming chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, voiced concerns that American Muslims are being recruited to serve as domestic proxies for radical Islam. He said law enforcement should investigate what he describes as “homegrown terrorism.”

“I will do all I can to break down the wall of political correctness and drive the public debate on Islamic radicalization. These hearings will be a step in that direction. It’s what democracy is all about,” King wrote, adding that, “To some in the strata of political correctness, I’m a pretty bad guy. To be blunt, this crowd sees me as an anti-Muslim bigot.”

According to The New York Times, King cites as an argument for his hearings the case of Najibullah Zazi, an Afghan resident of the United States arrested last year for plotting to bomb the New York City subway system. King said that an imam in Queens who had been a police informant warned Zazi before his arrest. “When I meet with law enforcement, they are constantly telling me how little cooperation they get from Muslim leaders,” King told the Times.

Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Center for American-Islamic Relations, disputed King’s claim that American Muslims do not cooperate with police agencies. Hooper said several law enforcement bodies, including the FBI, have thanked Muslim communities for their assistance. He said King’s history of harsh comments against Muslims undermines the congressman’s credibility to make such claims. “He doesn’t come to this issue with clean hands,” Hooper said. “He comes with the strong perception of bias and an anti-Muslim agenda, and that’s exactly what we don’t need at a time when anti-Muslim sentiment is skyrocketing.”

In a 2007 interview with Politico.com, King said, “We have too many mosques in this country. There are too many people sympathetic to radical Islam.” He later qualified the statement, saying, “The quote was taken entirely out of context by Politico. My position in this interview, as it has been for many years, is that too many mosques in this country do not cooperate with law enforcement. Unfortunately, Politico was incapable of making this distinction.”

It is not yet clear what “breaking down the wall of political correctness” will look like in King’s hearings. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), the first Muslim to be elected to Congress and a vocal opponent of efforts to denigrate Muslims, said he is fearful that King’s hearings will cast a net of prejudice not seen since U.S. Sen. Joe McCarthy of Wisconsin staged his infamous hunt for communists in government in the 1950s.

“What did Joe McCarthy do? He identified people he thought were subversives and then used his congressional gavel to hold hearings to drag people in,” Ellison told HateWatch. “He ruined a lot of reputations and injected a tremendous amount of fear in our country.”

Lately, a number of extreme right-wing commentators have spoken favorably of McCarthy and his efforts in a bid to revive and restore luster to his legacy.

The public may be receptive to King’s promised hearings. TIME magazine’s August cover asked, “Is America Islamophobic?” A TIME-Abt SRBI poll this fall found that 46 percent of Americans believe Islam is more likely than other faiths to encourage violence against non-believers. Only 37 percent knew a Muslim in America. Groups such as Pam Geller’s group Stop the Islamization of America (SOIA) and Brigitte Gabriel’s American Congress for Truth (ACT! for America) have sounded public alarms about what they perceive as threats from Muslims in America. Fox News commentator Glenn Beck used his radio pulpit to claim that 10 percent of the world’s Muslims are terrorists – a claim of highly dubious veracity.

Perhaps the most salient danger that King’s proposed hearings might present is that the publicity could provoke certain elements of society to resume violent attacks on Muslims. Anti-Muslim violence spiked after the 9/11 attacks in 2001, and reports of such crimes seemed to burgeon once again last summer as controversy over the so-called Ground Zero mosque in Lower Manhattan roiled across the country.

  • Ian

    Beales, and I apologize for the incoming horrible writing, but I never suggested that you suggested that any death justifies any other death. I did, however, accuse you of suggesting I am a KKK supporter because that’s exactly what you did. When you asked if I “don’t you consider it terrorism” when a group has “political views [which] agree with [mine]” you are clearly accusing me of a) believing that right-wing terrorism is not, in fact, terrorism and b) having political views that fit the views of said terrorists. Neither of those things are true and anyone with middle school-level reading skills would agree.

    Show one sentence, one phrase, one word, one letter where I “[discount] right wing violence”. You will not find it. You will, on the other hand, find a few places where I note that both Islamist and right-wing violence are a concern – though we (at least most of us) can have a reasonable, adult conversation about which is the greater concern.

    You did not refute my – admitably debatable – claim. Instead you suggested it may be untrue. And again, even if it was, I adjusted that claim.

    I am well aware of the work the SPLC does in monitoring non-right-wing extremism, as I pointed out befre when I mentioned the article on campus antisemitism. This does not, in my view detract from their responsibility to label some Islamist groups as hate groups also. For example, the Federation for American Immigration reform was – belatedly, in my opinion – labeled a hate group for a) the racism of its founder, b) the platform it gives to white nationalist conspiracy theories about the North American Union and the “reconquista”, and c) it’s current connection to racist groups like the CCC. Compare the bigotry and actions of FAIR with, say, the Muslim American Society.

    http://www.adl.org/main_Anti_I.....ociety.htm

    And again, to return to my original question, do you consider the various hearings into right-wing extremism to also be a waste of time? If so, why?

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    “You’re a pretty striaghtforward guy, Ruslan, in that it’s quite obvious you hate Christinas far more then you love your fellow Muslims.”

    BZZZZT! Wrong. I am not Muslim and am generally opposed to religion on ideological grounds, though I do not believe in attacking, demonizing, or degrading people simply for having religious beliefs.

    “Since the events of a lone loonatic in Okahoma literally 10s of 1000s (if not more) Muslims have been brutally murdered at the hands of their co-religionists. Most of the victims of muslim terror attacks are muslims themselves.”

    Let’s see, that lone lunatic blew up the building in 1995 IIRC, the same year which the bloody Bosnian war, as well as the destruction of the Serbian Republic in Krajina by Catholic Croatia, ended. Looks like Christians don’t get along too well all the time either. All throughout that time the Tamil Tigers were still active, and they were Hindus.

    The point is that these insurgencies we see have far less to do with Islam, but rather certain economic and political processes which have been going on in these countries. Islam is used by various parties to justify things that have nothing to do with the religion, and are sometimes opposed to its teachings.

    “But Hey! You’ve got ONLY one terror attack in with which to distract us from islamic Oklahoma murder and from which to draw an ridiculous and unfounded equivalence between 1000s of Far Right islamist inspired acts of mass-murder, and the actions of but a single individual.”

    Sorry but you can’t have it both ways- the majority of Islamic terror attacks you alluded to were committed outside of the US. Inside the US, one is far more likely to be killed by a domestic terrorist than a foreign one.

    “Muslim clerics often condemn acts of islamist inspired Far Right murder, but none are willing to take any concrete actions to ensure that other actions are thwarted.”

    Sorry but the question I was answering was the assertion that Muslims clerics don’t condemn terror, a lie of idiotic proportions. I don’t see what “concrete actions” they should take.

    “Islam isn’t ( despite its claims) an Abrahamic religion, and its clerics, thus, are under no moral or religious compuction , the way Jews and Christians are, to tell us the truth.”

    Laughably incorrect. The line of argument you are using used to be used against Jews, nearly word for word.

    “Several high ranking islamist clerics ( all of whom are Far Right) such as Yosuf Qaradawi have publically condemned terror attacks in, only to be videoed promoting and condoning acts of Islamist inspired Far Right violence against both Jews and Christians behind closed doors. Several documentaries done in Britian have shown many muslim clerics lying through their teeth on this question. Your links thus, and the info they contain haven’t any value whatsoever.”

    Sooooo…if we find a few people in a particular group lying, then everyone belonging to this group must be lying! This is an excellent logical concept.

  • http://devlin-mcaliskey.blogspot.com Tom Shelley

    As far as the SPLC and groups that are not part of the right, I’d point out:

    1) I think it makes more sense to put them on the right instead of the left, but black supremacist organizations are monitored by the SPLC. They don’t really qualify as left, but I imagine that right-wing opponents of the SPLC believe that the SPLC is ignoring such groups and should monitor such groups.

    2) They also sometimes have stuff about animal rights extremists and environmentalist extremists. I’m not sure they really belong as they are neither bigoted nor part of the radical right. But the SPLC do monitor them.

    So, the SPLC goes after groups other than radical right and/or white supremacist organizations.

    Tom

  • Mitch Beales

    Ian I never suggested that killings by the American right wing somehow justify killings by Muslims or that you are a supporter of the KKK. I simply refuted your claim that “in one day in 2001, more Americans died at the hands of Islamic extremism than were killed in a century of right-wing American extremism” and wondered aloud about your motives for discounting right wing violence while expressing great concern about Islam.

    What’s wrong about King’s hearings is that they waste the time of a Congress that should be dealing with real issues and inflame the public in exactly the way the McCarthy hearings did half a century ago. If you are unaware of the work SPLC does in monitoring hate groups not that are not part of the extreme right you have not investigated the SPLC very thoroughly. Perhaps you are “one of those gay, atheist, College Democrat, SPLC-supporting Grand Dragons” but you are wrong about this issue.

  • skinnyminny

    FWIW, I don’t know how true this is, however, here are some excerpts from a guy name Amjad Khan – he allegedly explains why ‘it is difficult to isolate the extremist minority.’ The source is http://hurryupharry.org/2011/0.....-minority/ here he says 1)Jihadists-these motivated by islamist ideology and believe in terrorism
    2)Islamists-those who are motivated by Islamists ideology but don’t believe in terrorism
    3)Wahabis-those who are inspired by ultra-conservative Bedoin understanding of Islam
    4)Traditionalists-those who are rooted in ‘traditional’ muslim theology
    5)Moderates/Liberals-those who are seeking to reconcile Islam with the Modern World
    He (Khan) then goes on to say that traditionalism is represented in most muslim majority countries and a majority of muslims around the world, and that they still hold many beliefs that are supremacist, racist, homophobic and potentially lead to violence…so reform can’t be expected from traditionalists.

    Mr. Khan wrote this in respect to Pakistan’s recent events. How true all of this is, I don’t know. I just wanted to share this, because like me, there are some who don’t know much besides what some anti-Muslim groups have to say.

    Minnie

  • skinnyminny

    Deft,
    I think you missed the comments posted by Ruslan. Ruslan wrote that the U.S. doesn’t have problems such as in other countries. You later posted you have seen documentaries produced in Britain. Point – Ruslan was correct. However, you are correct about Britain. Here’s something that should interest you, google “Cageprisoners, Munir Awad and the Danish Massacre Plot” from the site hurry up harry dot org. According to this, Britain has Salafi Jihadis, and apparently, one of the guys arrested, allegedly was detained at gitmo, but was released because it is alleged that activist/organizations and Sweden helped secure his release.

    However, keep in mind, as Ruslan stated, we (U.S.) usually don’t have the problems like in other countries. I’ve also noticed that in Britain, there are different groups holding protests at the Mosques. In fact, Terry Jones (Westboro) was to go to U.K. next month to protest at a mosque in Luton, but, was disinvited by EDL, in addition, there was petitions by other groups to attempt to deny him a visa.

  • Jack S.

    No matter how much evidence there is in the news everyday that proves religions are not value neutral and that some of them, islam, are downright evil and disgusting, the left still goes on with their blinders firmly fixed.

  • Ramses

    I immediately took offense with this claim: “Islam isn’t (despite its claims) an Abrahamic religion, and its clerics, thus, are under no moral or religious compuction [sic], the way Jews and Christians are, to tell us the truth.”

    First off, what is the truth? Religion, to me, is a code of law that promises a pie in the sky if you’re good and a thousand years of nightmares if you’re bad.

    Secondly, Islam is an Abrahamic religion. Abraham is mentioned in some passages of the Qur’an, and said book is an added component to both the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible) and the New Testament. The Qur’an does not replace either of those books, as I learned in a recent college class, but it adds to those earlier tomes.

    -”The ‘good’ in Islam lay [sic] only in that which promotes the dissemination and spread of islam [sic].”
    The same can be said of Christianity, but I do not know if that is also the case in Judaism.

  • Deft

    “Muslims” are employing car bombs? Because Christians employed truck bombs, for example, during the Oklahoma City Bombing.”Ruslam A.

    You’re a pretty striaghtforward guy, Ruslan, in that it’s quite obvious you hate Christinas far more then you love your fellow Muslims.

    Since the events of a lone loonatic in Okahoma literally 10s of 1000s (if not more) Muslims have been brutally murdered at the hands of their co-religionists. Most of the victims of muslim terror attacks are muslims themselves.

    But Hey! You’ve got ONLY one terror attack in with which to distract us from islamic Oklahoma murder and from which to draw an ridiculous and unfounded equivalence between 1000s of Far Right islamist inspired acts of mass-murder, and the actions of but a single individual.

    “Absolute, idiotic lie. Did you even bother to check? Try Google some time.”

    Muslim clerics often condemn acts of islamist inspired Far Right murder, but none are willing to take any concrete actions to ensure that other actions are thwarted. And there’s a darned good reason for that state of affairs

    Islam isn’t ( despite its claims) an Abrahamic religion, and its clerics, thus, are under no moral or religious compuction , the way Jews and Christians are, to tell us the truth.

    Several high ranking islamist clerics ( all of whom are Far Right) such as Yosuf Qaradawi have publically condemned terror attacks in, only to be videoed promoting and condoning acts of Islamist inspired Far Right violence against both Jews and Christians behind closed doors. Several documentaries done in Britian have shown many muslim clerics lying through their teeth on this question. Your links thus, and the info they contain haven’t any value whatsoever.

    The ‘good’ in Islam lay only in that which promotes the dissemination and spread of islam. When the truth becomes a hindrence to that ptopagation, then the TRUTH is considered an evil.

  • Ian

    I am a bit confused by Beales’s December 27 post. Apparently, everyone who suggests that ideology A is more of a danger than ideology B is automatically a supporter of ideology B. I guess I am one of those gay, atheist, College Democrat, SPLC-supporting Grand Dragons one always hears about.

    Remember that most human beings can walk and chew gum at the same time. Just because a person is concerned about one problem does not mean one can assume s/he does not care about other problems. I am not even suggesting the SPLC stray from its niche of far-right extremism. It is what they do and they do it well. I am just suggesting that they make a change in one small area, hate group designation, by being aware of the antisemitism, homophobia, and racism of some Islamic groups. They do the same with other religious fanatics without offending mainstream believers (evangelical anti-gay groups, radical traditionalist Catholics, the Jewish Defense League.)

    I have not seen anything suggesting more than 3,000 Americans died from far-right violence in the 20th Century. But let us grant Ruslan his immature obsession with “fail” (Seriously, you sound like a 13-year-old boy) at the expense of adult, intelligent conversation and assume my earlier figure is incorrect. I will change it to “more Americans have been killed in the last decade by Islamic terrorism than by far-right terrorism.” Does this new sentence detract from my point?

    The question in my other post was not rhetorical. I honestly want to know why people do not mind investigations into far-right extremism – “pro-life” terrorism, the Patriot movement, or extremists in the military – and yet are offended by this investigation. Why do some (rightfully) mock Beck, Jones, and company’s paranoia about the DHS report and yet see this as an affront to civil liberties?

  • skinnyminny

    I am at a loss here! On the one hand there are people raising fears about Muslims, yet, they are constantly caught with their hands in the cookie jar. On the other, there are people who are causing Muslims that are innocent to become potential victims of hate crimes.

    I’m at a loss because, I’m sensing that there are people who just want to cause chaos and fighting amongst the population to divert our attention away from what’s really happening.

    I just read a post about former NY atty John Whitbeck who now lives in Saudi Arabia. According to the post I read, he’s alleged to be a 9/11 truther and appears to be anti-American. On this same site, I read a post about Mr. Assange is allegedly trying to harm this country by exposing an ‘American-Israeli Global Domination,’ (or a sort of conspiracy of both) and that one of his staffers, Mr. Shamir (this name is alleged to be a pseudonym) is allegedly trying to form stronger ties with Russia-he is alleged to be anti-semite and holocaust denier.

    I talked about the cookie jar, because there are a lot of Americans moving to UAE under the pretext of not wanting to pay taxes. I saw photos on the above website that I mentioned with former Sinn Fein members in a cave while visiting Syria.

    With this, I’d like to know ‘what’s up!’

  • http://devlin-mcaliskey.blogspot.com/ Tom Shelley

    The link I provided to CAIN was close to what you’d want to read about torture in N. Ireland, but there’s another part of that site wit some chapters of a book by the same person who wrote the book I originally sent you to. The better material is at- http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/.....jmcg74.htm

    Tom

  • Tom Shelley

    “Kinda hypocritical for Steve King to now be setting himself up as a crusader against terrorism, considering that he himself is a former supporter of the Irish Republican Army (IRA)”

    If King has stopped supporting the IRA, I haven’t heard about it- in general I’m not very familiar with King, but I know he is/was a big supporter of Sinn Fein.

    I am very comfortable calling King a racist, but the fact that he supports the IRA is not part of that. Only about .25% of the time did the IRA intentionally kill civilians (and some of them were not completely innocent) (if people want to hear the details of how I came up with that figure, let me know, but I will say that it is based largely on information from the very academic and neutral site Conflict Archive on the InterNet at http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/ ).

    But that’s not the main point. On Torture, you can probably do some major damage to King, considering how he feels about torture in the War on Terror and torture of suspected IRA members in the early years of the Troubles. (some info about the torture in N. Ireland can be found about 1/3 the way down the following page- http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/.....mcg73a.htm ) King is a VERY enthusiastic supporter of turture in the War on Terror.

    I’ve been bringing stuff like this post to the attention of a friend of mine who is an anarchist Irish republican and does a lot of activism in Dublin, Ireland. His hope and mine is that we can get Sinn Fein to break with King and maybe even denounce him or something (SF is, in IRELAND, fairly consistently left-wing, so it makes sense to think that SF will ditch King). A big part of my blog is about encouraging SF to take a different approach to generating support in America (they talk too much about Irish-America and should be appealing to people who oppose inequality, imperialism, etc. generally).

    Tom

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    “James, in one day in 2001, more Americans died at the hands of Islamic extremism than were killed in a century of right-wing American extremism. ”

    Damn, how did I miss this? You said a century, effectively destroying your own argument as there were far more people killed in lynchings and related activity alone than killed in 9-11. Fail.

  • http://www.apolitical.info James Hutchings

    @Ian:

    But presumably the relevant factor is the situation now, not the situation nearly a decade ago?

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    “There has been no public denouncement of Terrorist actions by any Muslim Cleric, and no public outrage by the Muslim community.”

    Absolute, idiotic lie. Did you even bother to check? Try Google some time.

    http://theamericanmuslim.org/t.....rrorism_2/

    “We have had over 2000 people slaughtered in 9/11, another 15 killed by the Fort Hood Massacre, two people shot in Missouri by a Muslim terrorist shooting outside a army recruiting office, a dozen terrorists arrested in a plot of terrorism in Indiana, and of course the attempted bombing of Time Square, all carried out by Radical Muslims, most in the last year alone!”

    And yet far more people die due to ordinary, petty crime.

    ” The Koran, unlike the Bible, preaches hate and intolerance. Have you ever read the Koran?”

    Have you? Have you ever read the Bible? Did you get to the part about smashing babies heads open on the rocks?

    ” The Koran supports the destruction of Infidels and open violence, (anyone outside of the religion of Islam). This is a part of the text.”

    Please quote the part. I know you will, then I will quote the REST of that part, totally destroying your argument. This will be fun.

    ” The intolerance and hatred is built into the Koran, and this is a disturbing fact that all the politically correct liberals refuse to acknowledge.”

    ‘Politically correct liberals’ most likely acknowledge that the Koran is no worse than the Bible in that respect.

    “Read the Koran for yourself, and study the history of Islam, their shameful treatment of women, minorities, and other religions.”

    Ooh ooh, let me guess, by going to sites like Jihad watch and not actually talking to any Muslims or reading what they have to say!! What a great way to learn about a religion!!!

  • Difluoroethane

    nov2wasagoodday wrote:

    “There has been no public denouncement of Terrorist actions by any Muslim Cleric, and no public outrage by the Muslim community.”

    That’s one of the most ridiculous comments I’ve ever seen anyone make on here. I’ve read about LOTS of Muslim clerics denouncing 9/11 and other terrorist acts, and you can bet your bottom dollar that the vast majority of American Muslims are as outraged by these terrorist attacks as anyone else is. For you to claim otherwise is ridiculous.

    What’s next, are you going to try and convince me that Rush Limbaugh doesn’t exist, that President Obama is an alien from the planet formerly known as Pluto, or that the Pope is an iguana in disguise?

  • Difluoroethane

    Kinda hypocritical for Steve King to now be setting himself up as a crusader against terrorism, considering that he himself is a former supporter of the Irish Republican Army (IRA)

  • Mitch Beales

    nov2wouldhavebeenagoodday to google “Muslim cleric denounces.” You could do it now and you would find that many Muslim clerics have publicly denounced terrorism. Instead you post lies and nonsense here.

    Why would anyone read the Quran? Are you a closet Muslim? The Bible advocates making slaves of folks from neighboring countries among other abominations. Many have also interpreted the Bible as advocating shameful treatment of women etc. You could look into these things yourself but there would be little point since a fool tends to believe foolishness regardless of any evidence to the contrary.

  • nov2wasagoodday

    There has been no public denouncement of Terrorist actions by any Muslim Cleric, and no public outrage by the Muslim community. We have had over 2000 people slaughtered in 9/11, another 15 killed by the Fort Hood Massacre, two people shot in Missouri by a Muslim terrorist shooting outside a army recruiting office, a dozen terrorists arrested in a plot of terrorism in Indiana, and of course the attempted bombing of Time Square, all carried out by Radical Muslims, most in the last year alone! I think there are great people who are Muslims, but not because of the religion. The Koran, unlike the Bible, preaches hate and intolerance. Have you ever read the Koran? The Koran supports the destruction of Infidels and open violence, (anyone outside of the religion of Islam). This is a part of the text. The intolerance and hatred is built into the Koran, and this is a disturbing fact that all the politically correct liberals refuse to acknowledge.

    Read the Koran for yourself, and study the history of Islam, their shameful treatment of women, minorities, and other religions.

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    That’s it Domenick, if the rest of us aren’t as terrified as you of things which take place primarily in other countries, it must mean we believe that terrorism doesn’t exist, and that there is no such thing as Islamic extremism.

    Why don’t you take a look at things which kill Americans annually, and compare it to how many Americans die due to terrorism every year. You might find you are getting all worked up over nothing.

  • Mitch Beales

    Domenick I presume you’re a little frantic when you say, “an Islamic political movement … uses a diety to impose it’s agenda.” (I don’t see halal meat as a serious threat.) If you are suggesting that an Islamic agenda will be imposed by a deity we have nothing to fear since “deities” are figments of the imagination.

    Ian, have you forgotten lynching or the KKK? I believe they killed a lot more than 3,000 in the last century. Should we just forget about their depradations since they have lagged a little in the last ten years or don’t you consider it terrorism if their political views agree with yours?

  • Domenick, Anotheroneofthem

    Yes, Jihadi recruiters do not exist, The Muslim Brotherhood who vowed to destroy our miserable house from within, does not exist, Extremism is not taught in any of our Mosques. Global jihadist acts are non existant.

    What does exist, however, are Islamaphobes

  • La Piovra

    I am just old enough to remember the Mc Carthy hearings, as well as their counterparts by HUAC and acts on the part of the FBI and other agencies. What they were investigating was not even anti- Americanism but “unAmericanism”. Persons and organizations targeted were, among others:
    The Girl Scouts of America (allegedly promoting internationalism and making girls uppity);
    the NAACP(similar);
    Russian dance groups, including, those sponsored by Eastern Orthodox churches;
    Any atheists, agnostics, people from non-mainstrem faiths, and (of course) Jews;
    The producers of “It’s a Wonderful Life”, because it “promoted class warfare”.
    You want to live in that kind of society, Mr. King and ilk, go find one. Don’t try to create one here, because if there is anyone trying to impose “Shariah”, it’s you.

  • Ramses

    In the land of the blind, the one with an eye can be king.

    This is what is occurring. One group of people may have recognized that the majority of us are in the dark about Muslim-related issues and decided to plant their views among us via claimsmaking. This has been helped in this post-9/11 climate, where Muslims are viewed with suspicion.

    As another poster said: “Peace loving Muslims are victims and part of a duplicitous Machiavellian plot to subvert our Constitution by Islamic political interests.
    This is not about religious redemption.It’s about power, influence and wealth in an attempt to introduce and ultimately replace our Constitution with Shari’ ah law.”

    To which I rebut: there may be some who wish that, but Muslims make up 2% of the American population and are more or less spread out among our cities. And where is the evidence that “Islamic political interests” are seeking to “subvert our Constitution”? And how would our Constitution be undermined when the amendment process exposes a viewpoint to all who are interested? Mind you, I agree that more liberal Muslims are victims in this game of Islamophobia when we tar them with the same brush as their radical counterparts.

    Another poster stated: “SPLC seems adamant in defending Islam while labeling evangelical groups as haters.”
    To which I reply: the Southern Poverty and Law Center is defending Islam as a whole because of the rising tide of Islamophobia. We’re supposed to be a secular nation that doesn’t hold one religion above another, and somebody has to go to bat for the silent majority of good Muslims.

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    WHAT Islamic political movement exactly? Name names.

  • john

    Islam, like all religions, is a primitive form of philosophy. All religions have one thing in common – faith. Have pity on all who succumb to this epistemology. Do we despise the individual who believes this dogma? No! Do we despise the dogma? YES

  • Domenick

    How incredibly dense some people are, for not recognizing that this is not a Muslim/Christian religious issue. It is an Islamic political movement which uses a diety to impose it’s agenda.

    If you believe otherwise, you, like their exploited followers,are a testament to it’s deceptive success.

  • http://theblogthatam.yolasite.com/blog.php IludiumPhosdex

    Ian was overheard asking:


    Ruslan, are those who investigate Patriot extremism also “cowards who get some kick out of being afraid all the time”?

    And Samantha thus:


    So homegrown terrorism is okay when it’s a group of crazy Christians blowing up clinics and killing doctors?

    Need we remind ourselves of Josiah Quincy’s immortal dictum that “liberty is not safe where the people are not watchful.”

    And George Santayana’s maxim that “those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

  • Samantha

    So homegrown terrorism is okay when it’s a group of crazy Christians blowing up clinics and killing doctors?

  • John P.

    I don’t have a problem with law enforcement agencies keeping a close eye on Islamic organizations, even ones that have little or nothing to do with encouraging terrorist activities– as long as they have the constitutionally required “probable cause” to believe that crimes may have been committed, or are being committed. In fact, I would be very surprised indeed if the FBI and/or intelligence agencies connected with DHS or DOD don’t ALREADY have informants quietly ensconced into quite a few American Muslim organizations.

    What I find objectionable is that Representative King is fool enough to think the federal government should loudly ANNOUNCE that they’re conducting such spying, or planning to. That’s not the way you gather intelligence. That’s not the way you prevent terrorism. All this story tells me is that King is trying to improve his re-election prospects by pandering to religious bigotry.

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    Domenick, you are quite brave to continue exposing the Machiavellian Islamic plot to subvert America(in it’s “embryonic” stage, just like the Tibetan Buddhist plot). Thank you for risking your life to bring our attention to non-existent issues.

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    “Last newspaper I checked, the Muslims were employing car bombs while the Christians were having bake sales.”

    “Muslims” are employing car bombs? Because Christians employed truck bombs, for example, during the Oklahoma City Bombing. That’s ignoring the bloodshed visited by Christians against each other in Northern Ireland, Bosnia and Croatia, and Africa.

  • Ian

    James, in one day in 2001, more Americans died at the hands of Islamic extremism than were killed in a century of right-wing American extremism. Whatever measurement you use to determine which dogma is the greatest threat (deaths, attempts, funding) radical Islam is the much greater threat. While those who monitor “pro-life” terrorists and others on the far-right should be commended, no unbiased person could suggest that the level of the two threats is at all similar.

    Ruslan, are those who investigate Patriot extremism also “cowards who get some kick out of being afraid all the time”?

  • Domenick, Anotheroneofthem

    Well said Ian.

    It’s time that we recognize that there is the existance of an unwillingness to cooperate with legal authority, by the Muslim community but more importently recognize the reasons for it.

    Cultural and societal retributon, the fear of being shunned and looked down upon as not being of equal religious standing with the rest of the Muslim community.

    Peace loving Muslims are victims and part of a duplicitous Machiavellian plot to subvert our Constitution by Islamic political interests.

    This is not about religious redemption.It’s about power, influence and wealth in an attempt to introduce and ultimately replace our Constitution with Shari’ ah law.

    Many may argue that the threat is not real. I submit that it is and although it’s in an embryonic stage, it is real. Cancer does not start in stage four. It starts with a single mutating cell

  • Ruslan Amirkhanov

    Sorry Ian, but Islamic radicalization just isn’t a big issue in the United States. Well, except for cowards who get some kind of kick out of being afraid all the time.

  • http://www.apolitical.info James Hutchings

    Haven’t American terrorists tended to be white fundamentalist Christians more than Muslims? I’m thinking of the abortion clinic bomber types.

  • Blark Bart

    I’m confused.

    SPLC seems adamant in defending Islam while labeling evangelical groups as haters.

    Last newspaper I checked, the Muslims were employing car bombs while the Christians were having bake sales.

    Then, again, maybe SPLC is confused.

  • Ian

    There is nothing wrong about King’s hearings in the least. Hearings are absolutely necessary to combat Islamic extremism in the United States. They are just as McCarthyesque as those in the ’90s on the militia threat.

    Sadly, the Muslim-American community does not have a great record in discouraging radicalism and helping law enforcement. The situation has gotten so bad that the FBI no longer works with CAIR because of its connection to HAMAS and Hezbollah.

    This post sadly draws more attention to the fact that there are few Islamic organizations labeled as hate groups. Those few that have managed to make the list are on there more for their racial views than for their antisemitism, sectarianism, or homophobia. There is no mention of the Islamic Society of North America, Islamic Thinkers Society, the Muslim Students Association, or other extremist groups. There was one article on antisemitism on American college campuses, but that has been the extent of the “Intelligence Project”‘s or “Hatewatch”‘s coverage. The SPLC’s silence on this issue is deafening.