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Commentary

Legislation signed by Mississippi’s governor will help reduce the state’s prison population and make sentencing more equitable; many drug offenders will get treatment instead of prison terms.

Children left behind in Alabama’s Black Belt region deserve more than education tax credits their families can’t use. An SPLC advocate wants lawmakers to look “endemic poverty” in the face.

A former guard tells about her experience working at a Hattiesburg, Miss., juvenile detention facility and why she leaked videotapes showing violence against children held there.

New DOE data shows that black children are far more likely to be suspended and expelled from school than their white peers. We must reform “zero tolerance” school policies that push children out of school.

An SPLC advocate describes his visit to a municipal court where impoverished traffic offenders are sentenced to jail terms because they can’t pay their accumulated fines.

Kelly Fischer faced discrimination in New Orleans when she tried to find a school for her blind, autistic son. She became a plaintiff in an SPLC suit filed to ensure the city’s public schools comply with federal law by providing students with disabilities the educational services they need.

The SPLC has obtained exclusive audio of an Arizona legislator mocking Latinos and other minorities with racially charged jokes at a recent roast of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio at the Western Conservative Conference.

As Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer decides this week whether to veto a bill allowing business owners to deny service to LGBT customers because of their own religious beliefs, I’m reminded of an earlier era when a similar form of discrimination was rampant.

A ruling by the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that upholds California’s ban on conversion therapy for minors, a discredited practice that claims to “cure” people of being gay, is another sign of the collapse of the conversion therapy industry.

There was a line in President Obama’s State of the Union address that particularly resonated with me: “Opportunity is who we are.” The question is whether we’ll provide that opportunity to the millions of immigrants who are living and working in the shadows in our country.