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SPLC remembers human rights icon Nelson Mandela

12/05/2013

President Nelson Mandela’s death leaves human rights advocates across the world with an undeniable sense of loss. But amid the sorrow, we can take solace from the former South African president’s legacy.

It’s tempting to write off the recent report of a black San Jose State University student being tormented by his white roommates as an isolated problem. The reality is, however, it’s a symptom of a larger problem on campuses across the nation. 

In an interview with Oregon Public Radio, Portland lawyer Elden Rosenthal talks about serving as co-counsel to Morris Dees in one of the SPLC’s most famous cases – the lawsuit against the neo-Nazi group responsible for the brutal murder of Ethiopian student Mulugeta Seraw. Listen to the interview here.

On Wednesday, House Speaker John Boehner said there is not enough time remaining in 2013 to debate and pass immigration reform. It is almost as if the speaker believes his congressional colleagues cannot walk and chew gum at the same time. Members of Congress are not one-trick ponies, however, and Congress is capable of fixing the broken immigration system in the coming months.

There’s no place in America for workplace discrimination of any kind. But, incredibly, a half century after our nation outlawed discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities and women, it’s still legal in most states for employers to hire or fire a person solely because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Today, by passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA),  the U.S. Senate took a historic step toward ending this outrage.

Paul Anthony Ciancia’s language and references in his 'manifesto' seemed to put him squarely in the conspiracy-minded world of the antigovernment “Patriot” movement. The attack comes at a time when the Patriot movement has been growing by leaps and bounds, from some 149 groups in 2008 to 1,360 last year, according to counts by the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

For thousands of workers in poultry plants, a federal proposal to speed up processing lines will only bring more injuries and more pain.

The day after the church bombing

09/16/2013

I think everyone who follows our work will be interested in this article from the Atlantic. It's about a speech given fifty years ago today -- the day after the infamous Birmingham church bombing that killed the four little girls who we remember on the Civil Rights Memorial in front of our office.

SPLC client Chelsea Hughes, a lesbian mother, tells her story of fighting for visitation rights in Alabama, a state that refuses to recognize same-sex marriages and where LGBT parental rights are far from assured.

Eighteen days after Martin Luther King Jr. gave his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech at the conclusion of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, stark, unadulterated evil came to Birmingham, Ala.