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Forty-eight years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 into law. The message was clear: The voices of minority voters would no longer be silenced at the polls. Though our country has made progress since 1965, the flood of controversial voting laws pushed by states in the wake of this decision only underscores the need for the Voting Rights Act.

A year ago today, a neo-Nazi walked into a Sikh temple in Wisconsin and opened fire with a 9 mm pistol. The Sunday morning attack left six people dead and four others injured. The gunman, a white-power musician, eventually turned the gun on himself after a police officer shot him in the stomach.

Earlier this week, I was honored to testify before a special Congressional panel on race and justice in America. I talked about the Zimmerman case, the unfinished business of the civil rights movement, and our work for justice and fairness in the courtrooms and classrooms of our country.

"Nearly 60 years after the murder of Emmett Till, the uncomfortable truth is that for some in this country, young men and boys of color are still considered disposable. 

This is a day that will long be remembered as a milestone in our nation’s march toward equality for all people. By striking down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) as unconstitutional, the U.S. Supreme Court has said definitively that our government can no longer deny federal benefits to same-sex couples.

In its decision to gut key provisions of the Voting Rights Act, the U.S. Supreme Court brushed aside the considered judgment of a nearly unanimous Congress and opened the door to new forms of discrimination against minority voters.

As the U.S. Senate considers immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship for 11 million immigrants, there is still a critical need for the legislation to reform the nation’s flawed guest worker program and protect these workers from exploitation. 

New H-2B wage rule will better protect U.S. and migrant workers

06/11/2013

The SPLC submitted comments this week in support of the U.S. Department of Labor and Department of Homeland Security’s new H-2B wage rule. This rule, which was implemented on a temporary basis in April, represents an important victory for U.S. workers and a milestone in the SPLC’s advocacy on behalf of H-2B guest workers.

 

 

Flawed study seeks to justify discrimination against U.S. workers

06/07/2013

If there is a dominant myth in the debate over America’s treatment of the men and women who harvest our food, it is that U.S. workers won’t take these jobs. A recent study by a researcher named Michael Clemens at the Center for Global Development (CGD), a Washington, DC think tank, and released by the Rupert Murdoch backed Partnership for a New American Economy, makes just such a claim.