Wall of Tolerance

The Wall of Tolerance digitally displays the names of more than half a million people who have pledged to take a stand against hate and work for justice and tolerance in their daily lives.  Their names flow continuously down the 20-by-40 foot wall within the Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery, Alabama.

Visitors to the Civil Rights Memorial Center have the opportunity to take the pledge and add their names to the Wall during their visit.

By placing my name on the Wall of Tolerance, I pledge to take a stand against hate, injustice and intolerance. I will work in my daily life for justice, equality and human rights - the ideals for which the Civil Rights martyrs died.

Wall of Tolerance Visitors to the Civil Rights Memorial Center have the opportunity to take the pledge and add their names to the Wall during their visit.

The Wall of Tolerance demonstrates that individuals, not government or organizations, are responsible for continuing the march for social justice. It stands as a dynamic representation of the strength of the movement in America.

The Wall’s digital technology allows future generations of pledge takers to join those from earlier years, creating a timeless scroll of people committed to equality and justice.

A quote placed alongside the Wall from Robert F. Kennedy’s speech at Cape Town University in South Africa in 1966 reminds visitors of the difference each person can make:

Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of these acts will be written the history of this generation.
 
It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope.
 
And crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, these ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.