Former Racist Leader Charged in Woman's Murder

Extremist Crime

As a theoretical matter, practically everyone who knew Hardy Lloyd understood where the 26-year-old Pittsburgh resident stood.

One of Lloyd's favorite quotes, posted on his Yahoo! profile, was "KILL-KILL-KILL!!!!" He described himself as the "Doctor of all hate" and told the world, "I do not believe killing is wrong." His favorite movie was "Death Wish" and he suggested that it would be necessary to liquidate "90%" of whites, along with millions of "race traitors" and others, to bring about the Aryan utopia he had in mind — "Nazi Germany and Fascist Rome meet Davy Crockett and Lewis & Clark."

"Our new religion," Lloyd added, "must be the worship of death and murder!"

But Lloyd's pals still weren't ready for what was coming.

On the night of Aug. 3, police say the former Western Pennsylvania leader of the neo-Nazi World Church of the Creator (WCOTC), after arguing with a woman described as his girlfriend, shot 41-year-old Lori Hann dead. Earlier that evening, Hann reportedly threatened to break up with him, and an argument ensued that only ended when Lloyd pursued her from her car onto a stranger's front porch and shot her in the head with a .380-caliber pistol.

Within hours of his arrest, police say, the Aryan warrior had confessed.

Until 2003, Lloyd was a leading deputy to Matt Hale, the so-called Pontifex Maximus of the WCOTC convicted earlier this year of soliciting the murder of a federal judge. But Lloyd apparently was too much for even Hale, who booted him out of the group after Lloyd was involved in a knife-wielding incident and, after another confrontation, was involuntarily committed to a local hospital.

Lloyd, a former Satanist who calls for a return to "barbarity," met Hann through an Internet dating service. Hann — a divorced legal secretary who lived with her Newfoundland dog — was apparently impressed, describing Lloyd's essay about his path to racism as "awesome" and adding that "we need to act now!!!"

When police caught up with Lloyd some 48 hours after the murder, he was riding in the car of another woman who he had just met on the Internet days before.

Lloyd's father, Pittsburgh surgeon Jon Lloyd, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 2001 that his son suffered from Asperger's Syndrome, a mild form of autism. Since childhood, the agonized father said, his son had fixated on race — a fixation that nothing his parents did seemed to affect.

In the end, it seems, it was Matt Hale, not his parents, whose lead Hardy Lloyd wanted to follow.