The Blotter, Summer 2006

Updates on Extremism and the Law

Jan. 12
A federal grand jury in Dallas indicted the mother of Confederate Hammerskin member Gary Dale Stanley Jr. for allegedly threatening two women with death if they testified against her son in upcoming armed robbery cases. Stanley's mother, Margaret May Meough, faces up to 45 years in prison if convicted.


Feb. 9
White supremacist Christopher Chubasco Wilkins, whose body is inked with images of white supremacy and Adolf Hitler, was indicted in Fort Worth, Texas, in the October murders of three minority men. Wilkins' later escape attempt fails.


Feb. 13
Alleged Aryan Brotherhood member James Craig Taylor, tattooed with swastikas, Nazi soldiers and the words "White Power," went on trial in the 2001 murder of Pawnee County, Okla., Sheriff Dwight Woodrell, shot while investigating an apparent burglary. Another man was to go on trial for the murder in May.


Feb. 14
Three members of the neo-Nazi Unit 88 skinhead group were arrested in connection with the Jan. 8 attempted murder of group member Amanda Crow, 19, paralyzed from the neck down after her throat was slashed and she was left to die in the desert near Phoenix. A fourth member was arrested separately.


Feb. 14
Shayne Allyn Ziska, a former guard at the California Institute for Men in Chino, Calif., was convicted of helping the Nazi Low Riders gang distribute drugs and also allowing a member to stab a fellow inmate. Ziska faces up to 50 years in prison.


Feb. 24
Well-known tax protester and author Irwin Schiff, 77, was sentenced to more than 13 years in prison after being convicted of 13 counts of conspiracy, tax evasion and tax fraud in Las Vegas. He served four years in the 1980s on similar charges.


Feb. 27
Fugitive Joel Dufresne, the Petoskey, Mich., unit leader of the neo-Nazi Creativity Movement, was arrested in Florida for allegedly tying up and repeatedly raping his girlfriend and abducting their son. Dufresne, 27, was later extradited to Michigan, where he faces trial on 21 counts of sexual assault and one of extortion.


March 1
Police in Muscatine, Iowa, arrested 17-year-old Joseph Dewayne Titus, a white supremacist who used the E-moniker "Jew-Stomper," a day before he planned to blow up Muscatine High School using explosives found in his home. Titus later pleaded guilty to making terrorist threats and was sentenced to up to five years in a community-based, residential correctional facility.


March 16
Police in Orange County, Calif., arrested 23 suspected members of Public Enemy Number One, a racist gang that nevertheless includes some non-whites, in connection with identity theft, drug peddling and probation violations.


March 19
Federal agents arrested David D'Addabbo in Hyrum, Utah, after the one-time member of the Arizona Sons and Daughters of Liberty allegedly threatened to execute IRS agents by "firing squad" if they continued trying to collect taxes from his wife. D'Addabbo has a history of making similar threats.


March 20
Six members of the National Knights of the Ku Klux Klan pleaded guilty to selling stolen guns, allegedly to finance plans to blow up the Johnston County, N.C., courthouse and kill the local sheriff. They included the wife and son of jailed state Klan leader Charles Barefoot, who faces unrelated murder charges.


March 29
A judge sentenced Bridget Callahan, 34, a long-time member of the neo-Nazi Skinhead Dogs, to nine years in prison for her role in the 1998 murder of a 17-year-old girl who was stabbed to death in a Ventura, Calif., motel bathtub.


April 3
George Henry Jesson, a tax protester who came in fourth in the seven-way 2002 race for California governor, was sentenced in Los Angeles to 27 months in prison for tax fraud. Jesson was tied to the We the People Foundation, which has run several full-page ads in USA Today claiming income taxes are unconstitutional.