SPLC in the News

Civil rights lawyer delivers message of tolerance

03/20/2010 | Lakewood Ranch Herald

The axis of the obsessed and deranged

02/27/2010 | The New York Times

Prosecutors will seek the death penalty against three soldiers in Georgia accused of killing a fellow soldier and his girlfriend and plotting terrorist attacks at their own military base.

The Jefferson Parish school system already faces warranted scrutiny for allegations that it discriminated against African-American students in its excessive use of arrests at schools. The system has also come under criticism for the disproportionate referrals of minority students and the disabled to alternative schools.

A federal judge has granted class action status to a lawsuit challenging the Birmingham Police Department's use of pepper spray in schools.

A federal judge has ruled the state is discriminating against potentially thousands of U.S. citizens who live in Florida, by charging them higher out-of-state tuition as non-resident students simply because their parents may lack legal U.S. residency.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley on Monday announced the State has filed petitions asking the full 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider parts of two opinions issued August 20 regarding Alabama's immigration law.

Osmel Trevino woke up before dawn to a sound he thought was thunder. He walked outside to watch the storm. It was pitch black at the Scenic Riverview Mobile Home Park in LaPlace, but it wasn't storming the morning of Aug. 16.
Osmel Trevino woke up before dawn to a sound he thought was thunder. He walked outside to watch the storm. It was pitch black at the Scenic Riverview Mobile Home Park in LaPlace, but it wasn't storming the morning of Aug. 16.
Alabama's so-called "scarlet letter list," which was supposed to name illegal immigrants who had run-ins with the law, has yet to see a single name posted on a state website.
Osmel Trevino woke up before dawn to a sound he thought was thunder. He walked outside to watch the storm. It was pitch black at the Scenic Riverview Mobile Home Park in LaPlace, but it wasn't storming the morning of Aug. 16.

A lawsuit has been filed accusing the Alabama Department of Education of refusing to release school data showing the impact of Alabama's law cracking down on illegal immigrants has had on Hispanic students.

Orleans Parish jail talks stall over money

10/14/2012 | Associated Press
Although negotiators agree on how to improve conditions at Orleans Parish jail, talks have broken down because the city and Sheriff Marlin Gusman cannot agree on the cost of starting improvements.
On Mix It Up at Lunch Day, schoolchildren around the country are encouraged to hang out with someone they normally might not speak to.

Advocacy groups form coalition on youth issues

10/17/2012 | Associated Press
A dozen advocacy groups across Alabama have joined together to form a coalition to address statewide issues that affect the future of young Alabama residents. The coalition will focus on issues ranging from school policies that alliance members believe push students out of the classroom into the juvenile justice system to the services offered to youth reentering the community from the custody of the Department of Youth Services.
School children in Alabama and across the country are encouraged to branch out from their normal group of friends and sit with somebody different at lunch.

Southern Poverty Law Center president to speak in Milwaukee

11/13/2012 | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Richard Cohen, president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, will be the featured speaker at the Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee’s 42nd annual awards luncheon Dec. 6.

The Orleans Parish sheriff, United States Justice Department officials and lawyers from the Southern Poverty Law Center announced Tuesday that a wide-ranging agreement had been reached to overhaul the troubled Orleans Parish Prison, long criticized as a place of violence, sexual assault and abuse.

A New Jersey gay couple whose engagement photo was used in Colorado political attack mailers are “innocent bystanders” whose image was stolen, and their federal lawsuit against a group who used the picture should proceed, attorneys said in a court filing.

Here's something that confused me as a child: A student who got collared for skipping school would be punished with a suspension. If the deterrent is indistinguishable from the offense, how's it work as a deterrent? The eagerness of some to send away misbehaving students makes no more sense to me now. Nor to a juvenile court judge from Georgia who testified to a Senate subcommittee Wednesday.

A federal jury awarded $4.5 million to Filipino teachers who paid large fees to obtain U.S. jobs through a placement agency. Jurors on Monday found that Los Angeles-based Universal Placement International Inc. and its owner, Lourdes Navarro, failed to properly disclose the fees for the 350 teachers who were recruited for $40,000-a-year jobs in Louisiana, mostly in East Baton Rouge Parish.

The Southern Poverty Law Center sent a letter Thursday to Autauga County Schools Interim Superintendent Spence Agee demanding an end to policies it says exclude immigrant students from extracurricular activities.