Children left behind in Alabama’s Black Belt region deserve more than education tax credits their families can’t use. An SPLC advocate wants lawmakers to look “endemic poverty” in the face.

In the wake of a report that found state expectations for teaching the civil rights movement remain woefully inadequate, the SPLC’s Teaching Tolerance project today issued a guide designed to help teachers and school leaders ensure their lessons about the movement are robust and meaningful to students. 

The SPLC represented six students in a Gulf Coast school system where minor rules violations resulted in long-term suspensions. Now, new procedures are making a big difference.

The human rights of U.S. meat and poultry workers are being routinely violated in plants where workers suffer crippling injuries because of excessive work speeds allowed by the federal government, the SPLC testified today.

A former guard tells about her experience working at a Hattiesburg, Miss., juvenile detention facility and why she leaked videotapes showing violence against children held there.

New DOE data shows that black children are far more likely to be suspended and expelled from school than their white peers. We must reform “zero tolerance” school policies that push children out of school.

An SPLC advocate describes his visit to a municipal court where impoverished traffic offenders are sentenced to jail terms because they can’t pay their accumulated fines.

A federal judge has ruled that a case against two employees of Singing River Hospital and a state child welfare caseworker accused of unjustly separating a newborn baby from her mother may proceed – denying the defendants’ attempt to claim immunity for their actions.

Kelly Fischer faced discrimination in New Orleans when she tried to find a school for her blind, autistic son. She became a plaintiff in an SPLC suit filed to ensure the city’s public schools comply with federal law by providing students with disabilities the educational services they need.

Three years after a first-of-its-kind study found that more than half of the states fail at teaching the civil rights movement to students, a new report released today by the SPLC’s Teaching Tolerance project shows that coverage of the movement in U.S. classrooms remains woefully inadequate.