The Association of Educational Publishers (AEP) has honored the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance magazine as the 2009 Periodical of the Year in its Distinguished Achievement Award adult category.

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) today called on federal officials to end an immigration enforcement agreement with Mecklenburg County, N.C., citing immigration proceedings launched against a man whose actions led to the firing of a police officer accused of sexually assaulting women. 

Anti-gay bullying is one of the few remaining forms of bigotry that can go unchecked on school campuses. The SPLC’s new documentary film and teaching kit will offer powerful lessons for students and educators, showing viewers that anti-gay bullying is wrong – morally and legally.

The Southern Poverty Law Center today denounced the felony charge brought against a Georgia college student by a local sheriff’s department following a decision by federal immigration authorities to release her. The student, Jessica Colotl, was brought to this country as a child by her parents.

Arizona’s newly adopted immigration law is brazenly unconstitutional and will undoubtedly trample upon the civil rights of residents caught in its path.

An SPLC attorney whose work has helped bring profound changes to Mississippi's juvenile justice system has been recognized for her remarkable public interest achievements.

Fifteen years after the Oklahoma City bombing, the United States is experiencing an antigovernment climate remarkably similar to the atmosphere that preceded the attack, a Southern Poverty Law Center expert told an audience gathered in Washington, D.C., for a panel discussion and a keynote address by former President Bill Clinton.

April 19 marks the 15th anniversary of the bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City - the worst single act of domestic terrorism in our nation's history and a grim reminder of the fruits of right-wing radicalism. The anniversary comes as the antigovernment militia movement is experiencing a resurgence.

Since the SPLC warned the U.S. military about extremist activity among active-duty personnel in 2006, the Pentagon brass has steadfastly denied that a problem existed. Recently, however, the military quietly strengthened its rules to prohibit a range of supremacist activities.

Members of the Hutaree militia in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana were indicted in what authorities described as a plot to murder a police officer, then use explosives to attack other officers at the funeral.