Two separate European groups recently visited the Southern Poverty Law Center for insight on contemporary civil rights issues in the United States.

Prominent civil rights activist Diane Nash, whose leadership spurred the sit-in movement and helped create the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the early 1960s, said yesterday the Civil Rights Movement left a legacy for today: Ordinary people can bring about social change.

About 100 men, women and children gathered on the Capitol steps Sunday to mark the seventh anniversary of the death of Billy Jack Gaither and to rally for gay rights.

Steve Messer, a history professor at Taylor University, made the 10-hour drive from Upland, Ind., to the Civil Rights Memorial Center four times recently, with two more trips scheduled later this month.

Southern Poverty Law Center founders Morris Dees and Joe Levin were recognized recently for the work of the SPLC when the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) gave them its 2005 Margaret Chase Smith American Democracy Award.

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Taylor Branch emphasized the importance of making civil rights history pertinent for today's youth when he spoke at the Civil Rights Memorial Center (CRMC) here on Saturday.

Two cases filed in federal court yesterday charge that thousands of immigrant laborers involved in the reconstruction of New Orleans have been cheated out of their wages by major U.S. companies.

A federal court this week granted class action status to a Center lawsuit seeking reform of abusive employment practices that are rampant in the nation's forestry industry.

Coretta Scott King, the widow of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. who dedicated her life to continuing his work, has died. She was 78.

An Arizona court this week signed over the 70-acre compound formerly owned by Ranch Rescue vigilante Casey Nethercott to two El Salvadorans he terrorized nearly two years ago.