Paleocon Starts New Extreme-Right Magazine

Hard to believe there’s a need for yet another far-right magazine or conference, but now there are both. Richard Spencer, who was editor at “Taki’s Magazine,” an online paleoconservative magazine, is now executive editor of a new online magazine called “Alternative Right.” He calls this venture “an online magazine of radical traditionalism” that hopes “to forge a new intellectual right-wing that is independent and outside the ‘conservative’ establishment.” It also is loaded with contributors who, like Spencer, have long lamented the white man’s decline.

Meanwhile, Joseph Farah, founder of the conspiracy-laden WorldNetDaily website, says he is organizing a conference to be held in September called “Taking America Back.” Farah says the conference is a response to what he describes as the shabby treatment accorded him by the director of this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), which was held last month. “This one is about the ultimate issues of God, the Constitution, the tea-party uprising, freedom and justice,” Farah wrote in a WorldNetDaily commentary.

At “Alternative Right,” Spencer’s senior contributing editors are Peter Brimelow and Paul Gottfried. Brimelow founded VDARE.com, an anti-immigrant website, and he has described “Alternative Right” as a project of the VDARE Foundation. Gottfried has been a contributor to “Taki’s Magazine” and has spoken at conferences of the white nationalist American Renaissance magazine, whose editor has written that black people are incapable of sustaining any kind of civilization. Gottfried gave a speech at the inaugural meeting of the H.L. Mencken Club in November 2008 titled, “The Decline and Rise of the Alternative Right.” Brimelow was the keynote speaker at that event, and Spencer the master of ceremonies. Spencer and Gottfried also appeared together last October on “The Political Cesspool,” a racist and anti-Semitic radio program.

One of the bloggers at “Alternative Right” is Richard Hoste, who recently wrote that “low-IQ Mexican immigration is the greatest threat to America.” He also wrote: “Schools should stop wasting time trying to close achievement gaps. And not only do whites have nothing to feel guilty about, they are the best thing to ever happen to blacks. Even ignoring race, humanity will not move forward through equality or by raising up the really stupid to the level of just plain stupid.” Finally, Hoste had this pithy observation: “While there’s more miscegenation [interracial sex] than in the past … we should be heartened that white teenage girls aren’t passing themselves around in black neighborhoods.”

Joseph Farah, for his part, seems to be more concerned about President Obama’s birthplace than race. He’s miffed because he was a CPAC sponsor in 2009 and has addressed the group in the past. He says he notified CPAC director Lisa De Pasquale that he’d be interested in speaking to this year’s confab about matter of where Obama was born. Conspiracy theorists claim — without a shred of evidence — that the president may have been born in a foreign country and therefore is illegible to hold his office.

De Pasquale was quoted in The Los Angeles Times as saying that Farah’s eligibility lecture would have drawn a crowd, but added “so would a two-headed monkey.” That comment, plus the fact that a 2010 CPAC sponsor promotes same-sex marriage, led Farah to announce plans for his own conservative conference. The only details he’s provided so far are that “there will be free and open discussion of issues like the constitutional eligibility of the man occupying the White House.”