Threat of far-right domestic terrorism remains as nation marks 20 years since Oklahoma City bombing

The SPLC has documented a powerful resurgence of the extremist movement that motivated McVeigh. In fact, the movement has spawned numerous acts of terror and violence in recent years.

On April 19, 1995 – 20 years ago Sunday – a truck bomb brought down the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, including 19 children in a day care center.

The bombing by antigovernment zealot Timothy McVeigh and several co-conspirators shocked the nation, awakening it to the threat of terrorism from far-right extremists. It remains the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. 

Today, the threat from extremists like McVeigh remains very real.

The SPLC has documented a powerful resurgence of the extremist movement that motivated McVeigh. In fact, the movement has spawned numerous acts of terror and violence in recent years.

The SPLC today offers both a look at the movement’s history and an assessment of the current threat:

In October of 1994, the Southern Poverty Law Center wrote to Attorney General Janet Reno and warned about the "mixture of armed groups and those who hate" as a "recipe for disaster." Read the full letter here

Here's Mark Potok discussing his personal experience as a reporter on the scene in Oklahoma City, as well as the current state of the militia movement:

  • Terror from the Right, a list of more than 100 domestic terrorist attacks, plots and racist rampages since Oklahoma City.

An extended audio interview with Mark Potok: