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Neo-Nazi

Neo-Nazi groups share a hatred for Jews and a love for Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. While they also hate other minorities, gays and lesbians and even sometimes Christians, they perceive "the Jew" as their cardinal enemy.

Top Takeaways

The old guard of the neo-Nazi movement struggled under significant setbacks in 2019. The National Socialist Movement, a decades-old group with roots in the American Nazi Party, saw the widely publicized loss of its leader, Jeff Schoep. Groups like the Traditionalist Worker Party and Vanguard America—both of which were influential at the Charlottesville rally in 2017 but lost relevance in the movement during the aftermath—were unable to rebuild their coalitions. But the momentum of the neo-Nazi movement is building behind groups and online communities with a terroristic focus, those who commit themselves to more openly violent messages and strategies in service of their racist worldview.

Key Moments

Andrew Anglin, founder of the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer, lost three lawsuits, including one brought by the SPLC. His site lost DDoS protection from Bitmitigate and is regularly inaccessible on the clear web, though it survives on the dark web. Despite these issues, the neo-Nazi movement was energized by the string of racially motivated mass murders perpetrated around the world in 2019, including the attacks in New Zealand, El Paso, Texas, and Poway, California.

What’s Ahead

The frequency and scale of far-right attacks across the world have been celebrated in online neo-Nazi spaces. These spaces have embraced more openly violent messages, including advocating for more terrorism. This rhetoric will continue in 2020.

Background

While some neo-Nazi groups emphasize simple hatred, others are more focused on the revolutionary creation of a fascist political state. Nazism, of course, has roots in Europe, and links between American and European neo-Nazis are strong and growing stronger. American neo-Nazi groups, protected by the First Amendment, often publish material and host Internet sites that are aimed at European audiences -- materials that would be illegal under European anti-racism laws. Similarly, many European groups put up their Internet sites on American servers to avoid prosecution under the laws of their native countries.

The most visible neo-Nazi group in the U.S. is the National Alliance. Until his death, it was led by William Pierce, the infamous author of the futuristic race-war novel The Turner Diaries, a book believed by some to have served as the blueprint for the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

2019 neo-Nazi hate groups

View all groups by state and by ideology.
*Asterisk denotes headquarters​

American Nazi Party
California
New Hampshire
Ohio
South Carolina
Atomwaffen Division
California
Colorado
Florida
Maryland
New Jersey
Texas
Virginia
Washington
The Daily Stormer 
Ohio*
Alabama
California
Massachusetts
Michigan
New Hampshire
New Jersey
Texas
Washington
Wisconsin
Endangered Souls RC/Crew 519
Florida
Idaho
Feuerkrieg Division
California
Florida
Kansas
New Jersey
New York
Philadelphia, PA
Texas
Washington
National Alliance
Laurel Bloomery, TN*
Iowa
Hillsboro, WV
National Socialist German Workers Party
Lincoln, NE
National Socialist Legion
Massachusetts
National Socialist Liberation Front
Pennsylvania*
Alabama
Georgia
New York
National Socialist Movement
Kissimmee, FL*
Maricopa, AZ
Connecticut
Illinois
Kentucky
Detroit, MI
Missouri
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Vermont
New Order
Milwaukee, WI*
Florida
NS Publications
Wyandotte, MI
PzG Inc.
Rapid City, SD
Radio Wehrwolf
Wisconsin
Third Reich Books
Fairbury, NE
Vanguard News Network
Kirksville, MO
White Aryan Resistance
San Jacinto, CA