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SPLC statement on the shooting in Charleston, South Carolina

Our hearts go out to the victims and their families.  Black churches, including those in South Carolina, have been the targets of hate crimes throughout our country's history.  We know that they will remain resolute and their faith unshaken in the face of this tragedy.

A white man who admires apartheid walks into a black church and kills nine people.  According to an eyewitness, he says that he has "to do it" because black people "rape our women" and are "taking over our country."  It's an obvious hate crime by someone who feels threatened by our country's changing demographics and the increasing prominence of African Americans in public life.

Since 2000, we've seen an increase in the number of hate groups in our country — groups that vilify others on the basis of characteristics such as race or ethnicity.  Though the numbers have gone down somewhat in the last two years, they are still at historically high levels.  The increase has been driven by a backlash to the country's increasing racial diversity, an increase symbolized, for many, by the presence of an African American in the White House.   

Since 9/11, our country has been fixated on the threat of Jihadi terrorism. But the horrific tragedy at the Emmanuel AME reminds us that the threat of homegrown domestic terrorism is very real.

Our hearts go out to the victims and their families.  Black churches, including those in South Carolina, have been the targets of hate crimes throughout our country's history.  We know that they will remain resolute and their faith unshaken in the face of this tragedy.