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These groups espouse a variety of rather unique hateful doctrines and beliefs that are not easily categorized. Many of the groups are vendors that sell a miscellany of hate materials from several different sectors of the white supremacist movement.
Anti-immigrant hate groups are the most extreme of the hundreds of nativist and vigilante groups that have proliferated since the late 1990s, when anti-immigrant xenophobia began to rise to levels not seen in the U.S. since the 1920s.
The Intelligence Project identified 576 extreme antigovernment groups that were active in 2019, down from 612 in 2018. Of these groups, 181 were militias (marked with an asterisk), down from 216 in 2018. The remainder included “common-law” courts, publishers, ministries and citizens’ groups...
Located in a section of the Pacific Northwest that was a notorious hotbed of white supremacist activity in the 1990s, America's Promise Ministry is both a Christian Identity church and a major publisher and distributor of right-wing extremist tracts. Its current leader, Dave Barley, peddles a "soft...

We monitor hate groups and other extremists throughout the United States and expose their activities to the public, the media and law enforcement.

SPLC Designated Hate Group
The Liberty Counsel was founded by conservative activists Mathew (“Mat”) Staver – an attorney and former dean at Liberty University School of Law – and his wife Anita. The Counsel bills itself as a non-profit litigation, education and policy organization that provides legal counsel and pro bono...
SPLC Designated Hate Group
For example, a 2016 article on the FSM website stated bluntly , "Fighting and attacking others with knives and other sharp objects appears to be in the Muslim DNA." FSM's longtime president Carol Taber was also a vocal proponent of the racist "Birther" conspiracy theory. In its own words “It is...
A central theme of anti-LGBTQ organizing and ideology is the opposition to LGBTQ rights, often couched in demonizing rhetoric and grounded in harmful pseudoscience that portrays LGBTQ people as threats to children, society and often public health.
Kevin DeAnna’s Youth for Western Civilization (YWC) – a far-right youth organization that he ran from 2006 to 2012 – served as the institutional basis for the web-savvy white nationalist movement that would come to be known as the “alt-right.” While DeAnna faded from the public eye in 2012 after...

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